How to Cope with an Addiction

in Addiction

How to Cope with an Addiction

 

One of the most important things we do is break that isolation by mandating contact with others. If patients consistently come back from their meetings and retire to their rooms to watch television, we will call them on their isolating behavior and tell them to start knocking on other people's doors. That simple act of taking the first step and the tentative "May I come in" is just as important as any insight they might have during a classroom lecture or therapy session, for they have taken an action and found out the real cause of their loneliness—themselves.

 

Visit the Web's Most Respected Diet Information Site!

Another way we break the habit of isolation is by use of the buddy system. As soon as they enter treatment new patients are given a buddy who takes them around the unit, shows them where everything is, explains the schedule, and in the process enriches his or her own recovery by reaching out to help others. No matter where patients go for the twenty-eight days of treatment—for a walk, to the laundry, on a weekend pass—they go with a buddy. Lots of patients react intensely to the lack of privacy, but the truth is, being too private has allowed them to act self-destructively. We don't even let our patients cry in private. They've done too much of that already.

You can break out of the isolation you may be in at home by going to meetings of Overeaters Anonymous. There you will meet people who, like yourself, are willing to make profound changes to restore sanity in their lives. You may need more than an OA, however. You need a sponsor and you may need a therapist. Overeaters Anonymous is a support group, not a therapy group, and the meetings are really not a place to go to seek therapy.

Coping with an addiction in a group is a lot less painful than coping with it alone. I love the conference theme I used once: "We don't have it all together, but together we have it all." I have also noticed that people in 12-step meetings laugh a lot, not at jeering put-downs of others but at themselves. A room full of uproarious laughter is contagious and healing, and it takes the onus off recognizing you have an addiction. There are even those who come to see their addiction as a blessing, though it is not a requirement for membership in these wonderful fellowships. You can also break your isolation by reading this article with a buddy, with whom you are in constant contact. When you feel the need to reach out, your buddy will be there. When your buddy needs you, you'll be there, too. That kind of mutual support breeds self-respect.

 

Visit the Web's Most Respected Diet Information Site!

Author Box
Damon King has 1 articles online

Click Here To Visit The: Official Low Fat Diet Plan Website!

Add New Comment

How to Cope with an Addiction

Log in or Create Account to post a comment.
     
*
*
Security Code: Captcha Image Change Image
This article was published on 2010/11/10